Wild sings the bird of the heart

Wild sings the bird of the heart

http://thiswontbebigondignity.tumblr.com/post/92446713169/theteacupsun-lashlights-replied-to-your-post

theteacupsun:

lashlights replied to your post “I’ve gotten to episode 12 of Flower Boy Next Door, but I can’t find it…”

yup after twelve it kind of got too silly for me too. I would just skip to episode 16 at this point tbh

I get the feeling like this is a good place to stop,…

Yeah, I feel like all of the major conflict has been resolved, and I’m not up to the obligatory dose of senseless angst. I just want Dok Mi to be happy!

pika-brew:

memeguy-com:

I didnt know body wash could be so sexy and condescending

Every time I see this post I think it’s a fire extinguisher and I get really confused

pika-brew:

memeguy-com:

I didnt know body wash could be so sexy and condescending

Every time I see this post I think it’s a fire extinguisher and I get really confused

(via ahandsomestark)

lashlights replied to your post “I’ve gotten to episode 12 of Flower Boy Next Door, but I can’t find it…”

yup after twelve it kind of got too silly for me too. I would just skip to episode 16 at this point tbh

I get the feeling like this is a good place to stop, though?? The romantic arc has reached culmination. They’ve cried many tears. Someone got hit by a car. Dok Mi has found her way through past hurt to love again. Enrique learned how to act like an adult and not any one of my platoon of toddler nephews. I don’t care about Do Hwi, so whatever on that front. Jin Rak can go out on a high note?

I NEED TO SLEEP OFF THIS KDRAMA HANGOVER OR SOMETHING

I’ve gotten to episode 12 of Flower Boy Next Door, but I can’t find it in myself to go on. Is this show fatigue or actual fatigue?

malariamonsters:

yeo reum isn’t that mysterious.

he’s kind of a play boy/kept man and makes light of things because he figures it’s easier than taking things seriously, especially when you’re surrounded by people who would just roll their eyes at you for doing so. he’s practiced at taking things lightly. that’s why he smiles so much. he does genuinely like jang mi, but what does genuinely mean to a person like that anyway? and he has a highly developed taste for the absurd, which i’m guessing comes from some background of not being very wealthy and now he’s surrounded by wealthy people. he also knows he’s good looking and has no problem using that to his advantage. i think he’s pretty funny.

That, and I’m pretty sure he’s allergic to emotional vulnerability. Once you realize that, his whole mysterious persona or whatever kind of falls apart. Taking things/people seriously means you care about those things, and in revealing that you care, you expose your underbelly to people who would eviscerate you for it, and open yourself up to the possibility of more pain when/if what you care about abandons you. In that, I think he’s like Gi Tae; both of them don’t really do emotional intimacy anymore, not after they’ve been burned. It’s what draws them to Jang Mi, I think. Why does she make herself vulnerable again and again, they wonder, because it makes no sense to them. Ep. 6 definitely shows cracks in that demeanor, though, when he makes that kimchee pizza and confides in Jang Mi about his personal history, which is nice, I guess?

rinthewin:

dragoninatrenchcoat:

sol-shine:

#I feel like arthur lost track somewhere around maybe percy #and then the twins happened and he stopped trying #jesus fucking christ molly #Twins? #TWINS? #I can hardly tell one buttock from the other #let alone two identical children #blimey #just fuck it #damn it all #i’ll start referring to them as you boy and that one there

#wait okay I KNOW this one isn’t mine#his hair is brown

#Fuck did we adopt one?
wind-voice:

annabellioncourt:

muirin007:

I’m jumping on the “Tulio and Miguel look like Loki and Thor” bandwagon really late, but I couldn’t help myself. That horse is two seconds away from jumping ship.

SWEET GOD ALMIGHTY MUIRIN I LOVE YOU MORE

BREE OMFG

wind-voice:

annabellioncourt:

muirin007:

I’m jumping on the “Tulio and Miguel look like Loki and Thor” bandwagon really late, but I couldn’t help myself. 

That horse is two seconds away from jumping ship.

SWEET GOD ALMIGHTY MUIRIN I LOVE YOU MORE

BREE OMFG

(via everfaithfulservant)

Ideas of pure White womanhood that were created to defend women of the homeland required a corresponding set of ideas about hot-blooded Latinas, exotic Suzy Wongs, wanton jezebels, and stoic native squaws. Civilized nation-states required uncivilized and backward colonies for their national identity to have meaning, and the status of women in both places was central to this entire endeavor.

Patricia Hill Collins (via wretchedoftheearth)

(via angrywocunited)

The basic plot, which cannot be ignored even in the films, is that Harry, Hermione and Ron give up everything for their political struggle. They drop out of high school, they go illegal, defy the government, belong to an underground organization [The Order of the Phoenix], operate out of safe houses and forests and even raid offices of the government and banking offices. This is all done in principled opposition to the Dark Wizard Voldemort and a corrupt bureaucratized government that has been heavily infiltrated with his evil minions. This is revolutionary activity. But the movie version does not present it as such or emphasize these radical aspects of the plot, thereby entirely missing the dramatic sweep and action present in the first half of the last novel.

The novels recognize the importance of alternative media for political struggle. The mainstream press [The Daily Prophet] is shown as unreliable and unprincipled, eventually deteriorating into a fear-mongering propaganda machine for the Voldemort-controlled bureaucracy. For a while the alternative but above ground media [The Quibbler] publishes the real news, but it ceases to print after the daughter of the publisher is kidnapped. In the book, friends of Harry [Lee Jordan, with Fred and George Weasley as frequent guests] start broadcasting the real news from an underground radio station, encrypted with a password. This radio station becomes a critical link for the resistance, which is scattered and weak. Although we are treated to some radio broadcast updates in the movie, they are delivered by a disembodied and professional sounding voice, not our friends the Weasleys. This undermines the important message - a guiding principle behind the media coop - that in a serious situation it becomes necessary to produce your own media and not to rely on ‘professionals’.

The novel makes it clear that in this phase of the struggle the characters romantic lives take a backseat to their political activity, as Harry breaks up with the love of his life [Ginny Weasley] so as to avoid making her a target for Voldemort’s forces, who are known to use torture and kidnapping as tactics. The ‘love triangle’ that becomes the focus of the movie isn’t even really present in the books. In the books, the relationship between Harry and Hermione is totally platonic - Ron is shown as jealous, but the feeling is entirely without foundation. In the book Harry says to Ron: “I love her like a sister and I reckon she feels the same way about me. It’s always been like that. I thought you knew” (pg 378, DH US Hardback). This conveys that men and women can be close comrades and friends without being involved romantically. But in the film, Harry and Hermione are shown dancing romantically, and Harry’s line to Ron about his brotherly feeling towards Hermione does not even make it into the film. This completely undermines the important message that jealousy is counter-productive and has toxic effects, which is an important feminist message for young people.

How Hollywood Defanged Potter’s Radical Politics  (via girl-germs)

I can’t express how much I fucking love this article.

(via bitchyvegan)

(via strawberreli)

thefullmooninautumn:

omg kids okay so we’re going to talk about the –dono thing

because the stars have aligned and it is time for me to rise from my slumber and vomit forth half-assed meta and beanplating.  And this time I added pictures, some of which move, so maybe people will actually read it.

So.  The –dono thing.  I have read a lot - and I mean A LOT - of fanfic where Kenshin dropping the –dono is this big important step forward and takes their relationship to the next level because he’s finally stopped putting himself down and YAY except NO.

NO YOU ARE WRONG. 

image

First, let’s address the whole thing whereby y’all seem to think that Kenshin is being too humble when he uses that suffix.

In order to do that, we gotta talk about the suffix itself.  –dono is an archaic honorific, rarely used in modern Japanese.  So, to a modern Japanese audience, Kenshin’s use of –dono is part of a whole array of linguistic signifiers (including ‘de gozaru,’ the infamous ‘sessha,’ and addressing Hiko as ‘shishou’) that make him read as quaintly old-fashioned and a bit peculiar, like a well-intentioned relic from another age.

Specifically, -dono was used by feudal lord to address one another, and served a very important purpose.  You see, the only other honorific that indicates ‘very high status’ in the way that –dono does is –sama.  The problem with –sama, however, is that it elevates the person being addressed while subordinating the person doing the addressing.  It’s a gesture of respect from a social/hierarchal inferior to a social/hierarchal superior.  

Which is a problem for our feudal lords, because they must address each other respectfully, but they don’t want yield ground by implying that they themselves are inferior.  Hence, –dono.  –dono indicates an honored peer addressing an honored peer: “I, an honored lord, speak to you, another honored lord” rather than “I, the inferior person, address you, the superior person.”

What this means is - and let me emphasize this - KENSHIN IS NOT PUTTING HIMSELF DOWN BY ADDRESSING KAORU AS –DONO.

That is not a thing that is happening.

He is indicating his utmost respect for her, but he’s doing it as a peer to a peer, not as a subordinate to a superior.  It’s actually - given the intense sexism of Japanese society generally and in that time period specifically - incredibly sweet that he addresses women in such a respectful way.  Please to remember that JAPANESE CULTURE DURING THE EARLY MEIJI IS NOT THE SAME AS MODERN ANGLOPHONE CULTURE.  A linguistic habit that reads as unnecessarily self-deprecating to our modern, anglophone perspective does not necessarily carry the same connotation in fucking late eighteenth century Japan.

Seriously.

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Let us now speak of the second prong of this one-two punch of inadequate research: the assumption that Kenshin addressing Kaoru with –dono when they are in public indicates a lack of intimacy, or somehow indicates that he still feels distance from her.  This is, again, the result of applying modern standards to an historical setting. 

Keep in mind that we don’t know what they call each other in their private, married lives post-series.  He does address her with –dono in front of Yahiko in the last chapter, while she continues to call him Kenshin sans honorific of any kind.  For all we know he does drop the –dono in private, and I rather like to think he does.  However, it is perfectly reasonable for him to never drop it in public - even in the company of intimate friends - for the following reasons.

1. Japan is not a fan of the PDA.  Weeaboos everywhere have correctly surmised that addressing someone without an honorific is an intimacy signifier, which is why it’s so insulting if done without permission and such a big deal when your sempai says to call them by their name. 

2. Kenshin is a pretty shy guy, and has never been publicly demonstrative; every time he’s behaved in a way that indicates his feelings for Kaoru and sense of intimacy with her, they’ve been alone.  It is completely realistic, given his personality and cultural context, to think that he would never stop addressing her respectfully in public, even after their marriage.

3. Because Japanese culture discourages PDAs, particularly in the time period which Rurouni Kenshin is set, his failure to drop the –dono after the wedding would not be a particularly strange thing.  It was not, at that time, common for married couples to address each other by name in public; his use of an honorific would not be seen as indicating distance or lack of intimacy, by him, by Kaoru, or by curious onlookers.

Now, that’s not to say it wouldn’t be remarkable.  It would be!  Just not for those reasons.  It would be remarkable because of genderfuckery.

(you knew that would come in sooner or later.  don’t even lie.)

One of the traditional ways for a wife to refer to her husband is ‘danna,’ which translates basically as ‘master,’ in the sense of the person who owns me (as opposed to ‘shishou,’ which is what Kenshin addresses Hiko as, which is also translated ‘master’ but is actually an archaic way to address a teacher of the martial arts).  This was a normal and even affectionate way for a wife to talk to her husband; in fact, with the exception of the use of ‘anata’ in the familiar/intimate sense, most of the ways for a wife to address her husband emphasize his mastery and ownership and power over her. 

The ways for a husband to address his wife, on the other hand, are totally different; one common way is for him to address her as ‘omae’ (which is, depending on context, either an affectionate pronoun between equals or an insult; most often it’s seen as an insult.  Contrast ‘anata,’ which is completely neutral) or as ‘okaasan’ - meaning ‘honored mother.’ 

Basically, the ways for a wife to address her husband at that point in time were extremely sexist, framing their relationship of one as possession-and-owner, while the ways for a husband to address his wife diminished her, condescended to her, and reduced her to her role as mother/wife, with no regard for her as an individual.

For Kenshin to continue to address Kaoru with a high honorific while she uses no honorific, just as they had before, is actually kind of fucking radical.  If anything about how he addressed her would be remarked upon, that would be it – that he continues to address her with such absolute respect, even after he’s ‘won’ and taken ownership of her as her husband.  And that she continues to address him familiarly and intimately - in a way that could even be read as a superior addressing an inferior, if you didn’t know that she has permission to use his name without honorifics - even after she married him and became ‘his.’ 

Don’t take that away from them, yo.

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One last thing, and then I’m done.  Keep in mind, before you get upset, if indeed you are upset, that AT NO POINT in the series does Kaoru express any dislike for the way that Kenshin addresses her, or any wish for him to address her differently.  Her wistful desire for him to quit it with the –dono and the sessha is pure fanon and, to be utterly frank, a projection by modern readers of their own desires onto a completely different social and cultural context that cannot adequately sustain those desires.  On account of how it is a different culture, with correspondingly different ideas of what a loving, intimate relationship looks like from the outside.

In many ways, it’s part of the same glorious clusterfuck that gives us Batoosai, He Who Romanticizes Sexual Assault: the constant insistence that Kenshin and Kaoru’s romance must conform to the ‘correct’ (heteronormative, dominator-culture, patriarchal) narrative, and that its failure to do so somehow lessens its power and makes their love less meaningful.

So, you know.  There’s that.

AYEZUR OUT.

(via mswyrr)